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How to Give Ethical Corrections

Why are giving corrections so challenging?  Do we dislike improvement?  Are we too concerned about the other person's feelings? Are you too timid to address confrontation?  Or do we hope the other person self-diagnosis their error and improve on their own?  
 
Vincent Ivan Phipps teaching at the National Education Conference
 

How to Give Ethical Corrections

Why are giving corrections so challenging?  Do we dislike improvement?  Are we too concerned about the other person's feelings? Are you too timid to address confrontation?  Or do we hope the other person self-diagnosis their error and improve on their own?
 
Corrections are vital to professionals. We are obligated to get it right and to ensure those around us also do things correctly. So how does ethics correlate to corrections. Often our emotions, egos, and sense of self gratification impacts how we give corrections and to what severity we like to correct others. Corrections are less about us and more about impacting a process or clarifying misinformation.
 
Ethical - speaking from a position of authenticity and integrity.
 
Corrections - giving accurate data to address errors or miscommunications.
 
Here are three steps to giving Ethical Corrections:
1. Listen to understand. Ask clarification questions to clarify the other person's level of comprehension.
  1. When was the due date?
  2. What is the current process?
  3. According to the manual, how is this to be addressed?
2. Give data. Avoid opinions or feelings; instead give numbers, dates, percentages, and quantifiable information about expectations. Following are examples:
  1. All responses are to be addressed within 48 hours.
  2. The process is to first send a written report.  Second, file the event date and location in the system.
  3. The project was to be completed in 10 days with a budget of under $10,000.
3.  Examine solutions. Ask solution–oriented questions from the other person to welcome their involvement in the correction.
  1. What can be done to ensure we get and stay on schedule?
  2. How soon can we follow up to make sure we are all on the same page?
  3. If we were to start over, what is the best way to accomplish the goal and stay under budget?
 
Whether you love or hate giving corrections, correcting others is part of being a professional.  Since corrections are inevitable, learn how to give them ethically and professionally.
 
Vincent Ivan Phipps, M.A, CSP, is an attitude amplifying keynote speaker, author and corporate communication coach.  As owner of Communication VIP Training and Coaching, the company's passion specializes improving communication, conflict resolution, leadership and presentation skills for companies, conferences, and industry leaders. The National Speakers Association distinguished Vincent with the industry's highest earned honor, called the CSP, Certified Speaking Professional.  Vincent is also recognized in the top 1% of the world's best professional speakers and trainers. Reach him at Vincent@vincentphipps.com.
 

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